Monday, May 7, 2007

Michael's 2nd Post/Political Dissidence in China

If I were to maintain a weblog, I’d like to make it like topleftpixel. I’ve looked at some other photoblogs before and I thought the idea of posting only one fairly large picture a day was original in some ways. Nori blogged awhile ago about how the minimal description and commentary accompanying each photo leave many things up to the viewer’s imagination, and I agree with her. I think photos and art tend to do that anyway, but this site seems to have something extra. Another photoblog I read does have a picture-a-day, but with a fairly decent amount of writing accompanying it. I would probably do something more like that, not necessarily writing about the photo but more about the politics and culture that produce the photos and everything else in my life.

I probably could have stopped reading the blog Bellow, but I wanted to read all of the posts on her page after starting the first. As far as writing it is the best of the personal blogs that we were looking through. And as far as extending beyond whatever personal feeling/thoughts individual bloggers have to more universal feelings, it is also the best. Her posts about her father’s cancer are original and beautiful. They reminded me of why we do not question the fact that cancer rates our going through the roof; that cancer is a disease of civilization and corporate chemicals; why we don’t fight back. But those are just my thoughts, not Bellow’s.

Everyone should read this: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/arianna-huffington/time-100s-zeng-_b_47793.html

It’s about a 22 year old Chinese political dissident blogger and has a couple great sentences on the intimacy of blogs and blogging in China. It relates perfectly to this week’s readings. I would warn against reading anything else on HuffingtonPost, except for maybe outside news links, as it is mostly delusional. Like the article about Sarkozy put up today. It's wrong. And way to go France! Good job electing your first neocon for the sake of economic security. I guess you saw how well that is working out for us here in the States?

1 comment:

Stuart said...

At least its on the basis of "economic security" and not "homeland security."